Category Archives: style

Making a Collection: Part 3

Have you been itching to see the final design? I am excited to share it with you all, but I am going to hold off just a little. I know, I am so mean.

You can read part 1 & 2 of this series if you are interested.

A quick review of the steps I took, before the big reveal

Concept – Basically, this is where you come up with theme. It could be as simple as black & white separates or Kpop Jekyll & Hyde. During this step you might keep a photo-board of images, colors, fabrics, whatever you might find inspiration from.

Design– Taking your theme and creating garments that represents that theme.

Patterning – Creating a paper template for your designs or working it out on a dress-form

Muslin/Sample Garment – Sewing up your pattern to test the fit, making other tweaks and just see if it works in general.

Now on to the last step… Making your dreams into reality!!

 

Making the Final Collection

If you have not made a sample garment, this is where you will collect all your supplies, because of course, you can not make a garment without your fashion fabric, notions and interfacing. Let me tell you I purchased so much black fabric and white fabric, I don’t know what to do with the leftovers. The black fabric I’ll be able to use but the white fabric…. Not a fan of wearing white really.

You might happen come across this scenario: Go on various fabric shopping trips only to come home and the fabric just doesn’t work together. So, always keep swatches with you when shopping. I purchase my fabric in NYC, LA and San Diego for this project and even the weekend before the fashion show, just before cutting out the final pieces I still was not happy and ended up going to the fabric store. It happens.

Luckily, once you find the fabrics that works for your project, all you have to do is sew the garments up as normal. Always pre-treat and test the garments before cutting out anything. This was a must for me, some fabrics I hand washed, while others I tossed in the washing machine. Oh yes, hand washed and machine washed fabrics are combined in the garments for this project. You also should test your interfacing and stitching. For me I tested the Palmer/Pletsch PerfectFuse Light and Medium Interfacing and ended up using the Light for the waistbands and Medium to interface the facing on the jacket. They are still running a sale $19 for 3 yds with 60 width or 66′ width, check it out. Since my jacket used 5 different fabrics, I had to do test samples to make sure they played well together.

The bonus final step for creating your collection that you might not even think about until the last minute is Presentation.

Presentation

What the heck am I talking about. For my 1st Collection, I presented my finished look at the School’s Fashion Show. I am super happy that I have modeled in fashion shows around San Diego, so that I knew how I wanted to present my work. Looking back, it is kind of funny because, it might seem like my model walked into the wrong show, in a very awesome way. I really thought about how I wanted her to look. Head to toe. I did both her hair and make-up. Shopped for hair extension, dyed hair extensions, full Trice Salon services, researched good and evil make up looks and quick runway modeling coaching. All that said, I think I nailed it and I know it was a great idea to make her the last model, so she could close out the show. She pretty much stole the show, she gave a fierce runway. Mama proud.

Hehe, I know you guys are like, Geez Trice, shut up and show us the pictures. Okay I will stop tormenting you all.

Let’s start off with my design sketch and compare it to the final look.

©Sewtell ©Sewtell ©Sewtell

 

Now it’s time for the Final Reveal!!!

©Sewtell & M. Tebbe

©Sewtell & M. Tebbe
Outdoor Shoot
©Sewtell & M. Tebbe©Sewtell & M. Tebbe

©Sewtell & M. Tebbe

©Sewtell & M. Tebbe ©Sewtell & M. Tebbe ©Sewtell & M. Tebbe ©Sewtell & M. Tebbe

©Sewtell & M. Tebbe
Of course, the Designer/Model shot

I do want to thank my dear friend and model for letting me abuse you all semester. And sorry for using you like a pincushion. Love ya. Also want thank her Mister, my friend and photographer, for not getting upset that I stole your lady. Love you too.

Well there you go friends, what I spent a good chunk of this year working on. And guess what this is only the beginning. But right I am going to squeeze in some selfish sewing.

 

Making a Collection: Part 2

I am sorry that I am behind on posting this, but of course the closer I was to the fashion show date, the less time I had.

The last post was focused on Concept and Design, this post will be one of my favorite difficult parts.

 Patterning

Did you expect me to say patterning was one of my favorite parts? I bet you did not. I really enjoy pattern making. This is really where the magic happens, where you creativity shines. Once you start learning about pattern-making the more your realize how creative your can be making garments. Yes, there are rules to pattern-making and you have to learn how to make a pattern for whatever your imagination came up within those rules (or try to breaking them). I tend to always want to break them or at least find a difficult way to do things. One of the rules I always want to break is darts. This project I actually embraced darts.

Let me back up a little. In case anyone here does not understand what I mean by Patterning. A pattern is a paper or cardboard template that you use to trace parts of a garment onto fabric.  There are varies ways to approach making a pattern; Draping, Flat Pattern-making and Commercial Pattern Customization. There are more ways, but those three are the ways I  made patterns for my 1st Collection.

 

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Draping for a dress I made over a year ago

Draping:

I consider this the fun technique. Using a dressform, a garment could be created with pins and clever positioning. You can actually work in the fabric you intend to use and you can    see results right away For this project, I used the draping method to work out tulle part of my top.

Flat pattern-making:

This method is what I am most familiar with using. After using body measurements to draft a sloper (master template), I took the sloper and manipulate it to the design I want. I trace my sloper onto a piece of paper and then I freehand my ideas. This time around I freehand on the muslin that I sewed up for the sloper. Then I took measurement from that and plotted it on my sloper.

patterndraft
Working on 1st draft for top

Commercial Pattern Customization:

This term might be new to you, but the technique is familiar. This technique  is probably best if you are not too comfortable with drafting or pattern-making. Taking a pre-existing commercial pattern and making some design changes, which is different from fit alterations. There are some great patterns out there that you can have fun with this techniques,  Renfrew, Laurel and Emery just to name a few. After making my very first pant sloper, I decide to use  the Clover pant as a base for the pant design.

 

Renfrew with Pattern Customization
Renfrew with  Commercial Pattern Customization

Muslin & Sample Garments

After you get your pattern drafted, you need to make a muslin of it. By making a muslin, you figure out if the pattern you drafted works. You can solve fit issues as well as finding out that your garment needs some features added. One of the features I found out I needed was a zipper in the center back of the top. My model really could not get properly in and out of top. I really did not want a zipper to show in the back, but at the same time a true invisible zipper was not ideal because the length.  The perfect zipper would be an invisible separating zipper. I was told that they did not exist. Yet I managed to find it. I purchased  two zippers (1 white, 1 black) from ZipperShipper.com.

Another thing you might figure out during this stage is construction order and most importantly (for me) how to finish seams, necklines and hems. You might not think about that during the  designing or drafting stages, but it does come to a reality during this phase.

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Making some adjustments from the first draft.

 

I went back and forward about whether I was going to line or  use bias binding to finish the neckline on the top. I did use bias tape for the arm hole, however because of time, I ended up using steam a seam on the next line. :0

 

After making the muslin, you will need to make another pattern draft of changes you made in the muslin. You possibly will have more than two drafts. Always mark each draft, and don’t get rid of them sometimes you have to go back to the first one as reference. I only made 2 drafts for this project. I only really had time to make 2 and any other changes I made, I made in the garment.

1st & 2nd Draft of Back Vest Piece
1st & 2nd Draft of Back Vest Pattern Piece

 

 FirstMuslin SecondMuslin

 

You also might want to make a sample garment after you worked out everything, and it is best to do this in the fashion fabric or something very similar. I mostly skip this step except for making the pants.  I have a mostly finished sample or wearable muslin in a fabric very close to the final fabric. After that, you are probably ready to work on the final garment.

I will go over the final stage in the last post of this series. For now here is a sneak peek into the final garment.

 

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Disclaimer: Sorry about some of the camera phone quality images in this post.

 

Finds and Progress

A couple of weeks ago, I purchase this fun sewing watch at a fabric store in La Jolla. The name of the store escapes me. I love the watch! The slap wristband is accurate in it measurements and I just love the scissor hands. Super cute.

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For my class project I ended up just printing the pattern pieces on a home computer. It is so many pages, ugh. I started folding the corners, so I can start piecing everything together.

For the sewing-a-long skirt, I finished making the muslin, just in time before my best friend went back east. Sorry no pictures of the fitting. It fit mostly fine, but I might take a little out, so it is not to snugged.
So, this week I am hoping to get the trench coat patten ready for a fitting next’s week class. I also would like to get the skirt cut out in the fashion fabric. That means I need to pre-treat my fabrics. The sucky part of living in an apartment complex, shared washers and dryers.

Style and Fit

Is there any styles out there that you really like but it just seems like it does not work on your body?

For me Tunics and Bubble skirts.

I tried on the following top and it just did not look that good on me.

Charlotte Russe tunic

Charlotte Russe tunic (see more belted tops)

I tried this shirt on and it looks great. It could be a little bigger, its a little tight around the neck.

And bubble skirts just add volume to my hips.

I don’t plan to give up trying to find the tunic that looks good on me. Maybe it’s just a matter of getting the tunic at the right store. I also hope to pull of a bubble skirt.

I would really like to be able to wear more flowly clothings and not stuff that are fitted. Fitted clothing looks really good on me, however, now that I have back fit, I don’t want clothes to fit that close.

I also have problems with jeans. Who doesn’t wear jeans? I have yet to find the perfect pair of jeans. They never fit through the waist and hips. If they fit great in the hips then they fall down to low and I have to wear a belt. I hate wearing belts to keep my pants up, not very comfort. All my jeans tend to have thigh explosion syndrome. After a few months of wear, my thighs rip right through the denim. Clearly denim is not as tough as they claim to be. Another problem is length. All my jeans are pretty torn up at them hem. Once I become better at sewing straight I will make myself jeans. They will fit amazing.

It’s kind of heart-breaking when you really wanna wear something, it’s in your size but it doesn’t fit you right or it look terrible on your figure?

Am I alone in this?